Blog

BakerLaw Legal Blog

Services
People
News and Events
Other
Blogs

Certainty Provided for Consumers

View profile for Michelle Ogunlaja
  • Posted
  • Author

Today the introduction of the Consumer Rights Act 2015 has provided certainty for consumers. 

 

This Act replaces many of the consumer laws that were previously in place, as previously consumers were entitled to refunds for a reasonable time if the goods purchased were faulty, Whereas the Consumer Rights Act has stipulated consumers will be entitled to a full refund for up to 30 days from the date of purchase if the goods are faulty.  Retailers are initially entitled to repair or replace the product and if the consumer remains unsatisfied they may elect to have a refund.

 

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 states goods:-

 

  1. Must be of a satisfactory quality;
  2. Must meet the expectations of the consumer;
  3. Must be fit for the purpose the consumer purchased these items.

 

This Act reflects the change in time with digital downloads -  music, e-books, applications, software and films.  Prior to this Act individuals were not provided with any recourse if the goods they purchased by way of downloads were found to be faulty.  Now consumers will be entitled to a replacement or full refund if these downloads are not of a satisfactory quality.

 

If there are a number of individuals who are unhappy with the service a retailer has provided, the Consumer Rights Act 2015 has provided consumers with the right to proceed with a class action.

 

Interestingly the Act also stipulates consumers have a right to complain about the price that was charged if a reasonable person would deem it unfair.  This will no doubt cause a number of difficulties as what would be considered a reasonable price for a product is open to interpretation.

 

If you have any queries please contact our Dispute Resolution Team and BakerLaw LLP on 01252 733770.  We will be happy to provide initial free no obligation advice. 

 

Disclaimer

 

This information is for guidance only and should not be regarded as a substitute for taking full legal advice.

 

Comments