For you and your Family

Redundancy Solicitors

Redundancy Solicitors

What is redundancy?

Redundancies are a form of dismissal which can take place when the requirement for an employee’s job no longer exists, or there is a workplace or office closure.  They can be compulsory or voluntary. Being made redundant can be daunting.

The law dictates that employers should follow a process when dealing with redundancies. If your employer fails to follow a fair process, your dismissal may be unfair.

We can explain the process that your employer should follow, advise you on steps that you can take throughout the process, calculate any statutory or enhanced redundancy entitlements and deal with any agreement which your employer requires you to sign setting out the terms agreed.

We can also advise you on the interplay between your redundancy and any restrictions in your Contract of Employment on your activities post-termination.

Are redundancy payments tax free?

Genuine redundancy payments may be paid tax free but this does not apply to all payments. It is important to ensure that if your employer is requiring you to sign a Settlement Agreement, the payments are structured correctly otherwise you may be liable for tax or national insurance contributions on some or all of the payments.

If you would like a confidential chat to see how we can help, please contact our Employment team on 01252 733770 or email us.

 

How will Brexit affect employment laws?

Andrew Peters
  • Posted
  • Author

After the long-awaited separation of the UK from the European Union, you may be left wondering how employment laws could change and the affect it could have on managing your employees. From 31 December 2020, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) can no longer...

How will Brexit affect employment laws?

Andrew Peters
  • Posted
  • Author

After the long-awaited separation of the UK from the European Union, you may be left wondering how employment laws could change and the affect it could have on managing your employees . From 31 December 2020, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) can no...